Thursday, 5 December 2013

Parish of Cooks River [4/5]

After an hour's wander around and through the graveyard, I turned my attention to the church itself. And no sooner had I done so than the pastor, Andrew, came over to chat with me. He was most generous with his time, even once he realised it was the history of the church which had lured me there, rather than the word of The Lord.
So, he opened it up and gave me a guided tour, and graciously left me alone, asking me to pull the door to on my departure. The building is showing its age, and although loved, could do with more TLC than its meagre parishioners can afford. It started off as a church in a working class area, sans bells and whistles. And although the surrounding streets are becoming just a little bit gentrified, the educated middle-class are not frequenters of churches in this country. I do not think they are at any rate.

However, the community is beginning to use the hall for a range of activities that will bring in a bit of money. But it is the history of the place that they are working upon. More on that in the final post.

6 comments:

G. W. Bill Miller said...

I like to nose around in old churches.

Julie said...

Mee. too, Bill. Especially ones with graveyards.

Joe said...

I'm glad it is in a reasonable state of repair Julie. It is sad to see them deteriorate.

Julie said...

Yes, I have seen many older churches in rural France in a very sad state, Joe. But in Europe trying to keep all old buildings in a reasonable state of repair is well nigh impossible financially.

diane b said...

Some yuppies are buying old churches and turning them into modern homes. I wouldn't be surprised if this doesn't happen here.

Julie said...

Yes, that has happened in parts od Sydney thaat I know of. Won't happen here because of the graves.